Articles | Volume 8, issue 1
SOIL, 8, 319–335, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-8-319-2022
SOIL, 8, 319–335, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-8-319-2022
Original research article
12 Apr 2022
Original research article | 12 Apr 2022

Modelling the effect of catena position and hydrology on soil chemical weathering

Vanesa García-Gamero et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on soil-2021-78', Anonymous Referee #1, 08 Nov 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on soil-2021-78', Anonymous Referee #2, 08 Nov 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Vanesa García Gamero, 03 Jan 2022
  • RC3: 'Comment on soil-2021-78', Anonymous Referee #3, 15 Nov 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Vanesa García Gamero, 03 Jan 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (11 Jan 2022) by Jeffrey Homburg
AR by Vanesa García Gamero on behalf of the Authors (30 Jan 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (02 Feb 2022) by Jeffrey Homburg
ED: Publish as is (15 Feb 2022) by John Quinton(Executive Editor)
Download
Short summary
Short-scale soil variability has received much less attention than at the regional scale. The chemical depletion fraction (CDF), a proxy for chemical weathering, was measured and simulated with SoilGen along two opposite slopes in southern Spain. The results show that differences in CDF could not be explained by topography alone but by hydrological parameters. The model sensitivity test shows the maximum CDF value for intermediate precipitation has similar findings to other soil properties.