Articles | Volume 7, issue 2
SOIL, 7, 477–494, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-7-477-2021
SOIL, 7, 477–494, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-7-477-2021

Original research article 02 Aug 2021

Original research article | 02 Aug 2021

Whole-soil warming decreases abundance and modifies the community structure of microorganisms in the subsoil but not in surface soil

Cyrill U. Zosso et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on soil-2021-14', Grace Pold, 25 Feb 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Cyrill Zosso, 27 Apr 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on soil-2021-14', Anonymous Referee #2, 05 Mar 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Cyrill Zosso, 27 Apr 2021
  • EC1: 'Comment on soil-2021-14', Ashish Malik, 08 Mar 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on EC1', Cyrill Zosso, 27 Apr 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Revision (30 Apr 2021) by Ashish Malik
AR by Cyrill Zosso on behalf of the Authors (07 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (08 Jun 2021) by Ashish Malik
ED: Publish as is (09 Jun 2021) by Jeanette Whitaker(Executive Editor)
AR by Cyrill Zosso on behalf of the Authors (11 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
How subsoil microorganisms respond to warming is largely unknown, despite their crucial role in the soil organic carbon cycle. We observed that the subsoil microbial community composition was more responsive to warming compared to the topsoil community composition. Decreased microbial abundance in subsoils, as observed in this study, might reduce the magnitude of the respiration response over time, and a shift in the microbial community will likely affect the cycling of soil organic carbon.