Articles | Volume 6, issue 2
SOIL, 6, 299–313, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-6-299-2020
SOIL, 6, 299–313, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-6-299-2020

Original research article 17 Jul 2020

Original research article | 17 Jul 2020

Switch of fungal to bacterial degradation in natural, drained and rewetted oligotrophic peatlands reflected in δ15N and fatty acid composition

Miriam Groß-Schmölders et al.

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Short summary
Degradation turns peatlands into a source of CO2. There is no cost- or time-efficient method available for indicating peatland hydrology or the success of restoration. We found that 15N values have a clear link to microbial communities and degradation. We identified trends in natural, drained and rewetted conditions and concluded that 15N depth profiles can act as a reliable and efficient tool for obtaining information on current hydrology, restoration success and drainage history.