Articles | Volume 6, issue 2
SOIL, 6, 299–313, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-6-299-2020
SOIL, 6, 299–313, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-6-299-2020

Original research article 17 Jul 2020

Original research article | 17 Jul 2020

Switch of fungal to bacterial degradation in natural, drained and rewetted oligotrophic peatlands reflected in δ15N and fatty acid composition

Miriam Groß-Schmölders et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (19 Mar 2020) by Jeanette Whitaker
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (11 May 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (11 May 2020) by Jeanette Whitaker
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (15 May 2020)
RR by Lukas Kohl (25 May 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (03 Jun 2020) by Jeanette Whitaker
AR by Miriam Groß-Schmölders on behalf of the Authors (09 Jun 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (15 Jun 2020) by Jeanette Whitaker
ED: Publish as is (18 Jun 2020) by John Quinton(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
Degradation turns peatlands into a source of CO2. There is no cost- or time-efficient method available for indicating peatland hydrology or the success of restoration. We found that 15N values have a clear link to microbial communities and degradation. We identified trends in natural, drained and rewetted conditions and concluded that 15N depth profiles can act as a reliable and efficient tool for obtaining information on current hydrology, restoration success and drainage history.