Articles | Volume 6, issue 1
SOIL, 6, 179–194, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-6-179-2020
SOIL, 6, 179–194, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-6-179-2020

Original research article 15 May 2020

Original research article | 15 May 2020

Variation of soil organic carbon, stable isotopes, and soil quality indicators across an erosion–deposition catena in a historical Spanish olive orchard

José A. Gómez et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (12 Jan 2020) by Olivier Evrard
AR by Jose Alfonso Gomez on behalf of the Authors (03 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (03 Mar 2020) by Olivier Evrard
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (11 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (12 Mar 2020) by Olivier Evrard
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (14 Mar 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (24 Mar 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (25 Mar 2020) by Olivier Evrard
AR by Jose Alfonso Gomez on behalf of the Authors (26 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (02 Apr 2020) by Olivier Evrard
AR by Jose Alfonso Gomez on behalf of the Authors (04 Apr 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (07 Apr 2020) by Olivier Evrard
ED: Publish as is (15 Apr 2020) by Kristof Van Oost(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
The long-term evolution of soil organic carbon in an olive orchard (planted in 1856) was evaluated and compared to an adjacent undisturbed natural area. Total soil organic carbon in the top 40 cm of the soil in the orchard was reduced to 25 % of that in the undisturbed area. The deposition downslope in the orchard of sediment coming from the eroded upslope area did not increase the accumulation of organic carbon in soil, but it quadrupled available phosphorus and improved overall soil quality.