Articles | Volume 3, issue 1
SOIL, 3, 1–16, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-3-1-2017
SOIL, 3, 1–16, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-3-1-2017
Original research article
04 Jan 2017
Original research article | 04 Jan 2017

Greater soil carbon stocks and faster turnover rates with increasing agricultural productivity

Jonathan Sanderman et al.

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Short summary
Knowledge of how soil carbon stocks and flows change in response to agronomic management decisions is a critical step in devising management strategies that best promote food security while mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. Here, we present 40 years of data demonstrating that increasing productivity both leads to greater carbon stocks and accelerates the decomposition of soil organic matter, thus providing more nutrients back to the crop.