Articles | Volume 2, issue 4
SOIL, 2, 565–582, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2-565-2016

Special issue: Soil science in a changing world: contributions of soil science...

SOIL, 2, 565–582, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2-565-2016

Review article 01 Nov 2016

Review article | 01 Nov 2016

Soil fauna: key to new carbon models

Juliane Filser et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Revision (17 Jul 2016) by Miriam Muñoz-Rojas
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (16 Aug 2016)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (30 Aug 2016) by Miriam Muñoz-Rojas
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (04 Sep 2016)
RR by Oswald Schmitz (14 Sep 2016)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (review by Editor) (17 Sep 2016) by Miriam Muñoz-Rojas
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (06 Oct 2016)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (11 Oct 2016) by Miriam Muñoz-Rojas
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (11 Oct 2016) by Jorge Mataix-Solera(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
Soils store more than 3 times as much carbon than the atmosphere, but global carbon models still suffer from large uncertainty. We argue that this may be due to the fact that soil animals are not taken into account in such models. They dig, eat and distribute dead organic matter and microorganisms, and the quantity of their activity is often huge. Soil animals affect microbial activity, soil water content, soil structure, erosion and plant growth – and all of this affects carbon cycling.