Articles | Volume 6, issue 1
SOIL, 6, 131–144, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-6-131-2020
SOIL, 6, 131–144, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-6-131-2020

Original research article 06 Apr 2020

Original research article | 06 Apr 2020

Ramped thermal analysis for isolating biologically meaningful soil organic matter fractions with distinct residence times

Jonathan Sanderman and A. Stuart Grandy

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (17 Jan 2020) by Kristof Van Oost
AR by Jonathan Sanderman on behalf of the Authors (17 Jan 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (01 Feb 2020) by Steven Sleutel
AR by Jonathan Sanderman on behalf of the Authors (17 Feb 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (19 Feb 2020) by Steven Sleutel
ED: Publish as is (19 Feb 2020) by Kristof Van Oost(Executive Editor)

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Jonathan Sanderman on behalf of the Authors (27 Mar 2020)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (02 Apr 2020) by Steven Sleutel
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Short summary
Soils contain one of the largest and most dynamic pools of carbon on Earth, yet scientists still struggle to understand the reactivity and fate of soil organic matter upon disturbance. In this study, we found that with increasing thermal stability, the turnover time of organic matter increased from decades to centuries with a concurrent shift in chemical composition. In this proof-of-concept study, we found that ramped thermal analyses can provide new insights for understanding soil carbon.