Articles | Volume 5, issue 2
SOIL, 5, 367–382, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-5-367-2019
SOIL, 5, 367–382, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-5-367-2019

Original research article 17 Dec 2019

Original research article | 17 Dec 2019

Evaluating the effects of soil erosion and productivity decline on soil carbon dynamics using a model-based approach

Samuel Bouchoms et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (03 Dec 2018) by Peter Fiener
AR by Samuel Bouchoms on behalf of the Authors (05 Apr 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Revision (15 Apr 2019) by Peter Fiener
AR by Samuel Bouchoms on behalf of the Authors (30 Sep 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (08 Oct 2019) by Peter Fiener
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (24 Oct 2019) by Johan Six(Executive Editor)
AR by Samuel Bouchoms on behalf of the Authors (01 Nov 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Soil erosion has detrimental effects on soil fertility which can reduce carbon inputs coming from crops to soils. Our study integrated this effect into a model linking soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics to erosion and crop productivity. When compared to observations, the inclusion of productivity improved SOC loss predictions. Over centuries, ignoring crop productivity evolution in models could result in underestimating SOC loss and overestimating C exchanged with the atmosphere.