Articles | Volume 5, issue 2
SOIL, 5, 303–313, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-5-303-2019
SOIL, 5, 303–313, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-5-303-2019
Original research article
15 Oct 2019
Original research article | 15 Oct 2019

Women's agricultural practices and their effects on soil nutrient content in the Nyalenda urban gardens of Kisumu, Kenya

Nicolette Tamara Regina Johanna Maria Jonkman et al.

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Short summary
In the urban gardens of Kisumu we interviewed female farmers to determine the sources and scope of their agricultural knowledge. We assessed the impact of the knowledge by comparing the influence of two types of management on soil nutrients. While one type of management was more effective in terms of preserving soil nutrients, the other management type had socioeconomic benefits. Both environmental and socioeconomic effects have to be considered in agricultural training to increase their impact.