Articles | Volume 5, issue 2
SOIL, 5, 303–313, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-5-303-2019
SOIL, 5, 303–313, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-5-303-2019

Original research article 15 Oct 2019

Original research article | 15 Oct 2019

Women's agricultural practices and their effects on soil nutrient content in the Nyalenda urban gardens of Kisumu, Kenya

Nicolette Tamara Regina Johanna Maria Jonkman et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (15 Oct 2018) by Nikolaus J. Kuhn
AR by Nicolette Tamara Jonkman on behalf of the Authors (25 Nov 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (17 Jan 2019) by Nikolaus J. Kuhn
RR by Karoline Hemminger (05 Feb 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (12 Feb 2019)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (14 Feb 2019) by Nikolaus J. Kuhn
AR by Nicolette Tamara Jonkman on behalf of the Authors (27 Mar 2019)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (12 Apr 2019) by Nikolaus J. Kuhn
RR by Karoline Hemminger (29 Apr 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (03 May 2019)
ED: Revision (09 May 2019) by Nikolaus J. Kuhn
AR by Nicolette Tamara Jonkman on behalf of the Authors (01 Jul 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (31 Jul 2019) by Nikolaus J. Kuhn
ED: Publish as is (11 Aug 2019) by Johan Six(Executive Editor)
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Short summary
In the urban gardens of Kisumu we interviewed female farmers to determine the sources and scope of their agricultural knowledge. We assessed the impact of the knowledge by comparing the influence of two types of management on soil nutrients. While one type of management was more effective in terms of preserving soil nutrients, the other management type had socioeconomic benefits. Both environmental and socioeconomic effects have to be considered in agricultural training to increase their impact.