Articles | Volume 3, issue 2
SOIL, 3, 95–112, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-3-95-2017
SOIL, 3, 95–112, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-3-95-2017

Original research article 23 May 2017

Original research article | 23 May 2017

Nitrate retention capacity of milldam-impacted legacy sediments and relict A horizon soils

Julie N. Weitzman and Jason P. Kaye

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Latest update: 16 Jun 2021
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Short summary
Prior research found nitrate losses in mid-Atlantic streams following drought but no mechanistic explanation. We aim to understand how legacy sediments influence soil–stream nitrate transfer. We found that surface legacy sediments do not retain excess nitrate inputs well; once exposed, previously buried soils experience the largest drought-induced nitrate losses; and, restoration that reconnects stream and floodplain via legacy sediment removal may initially cause high losses of nitrate.