Articles | Volume 2, issue 2
SOIL, 2, 175–184, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2-175-2016
SOIL, 2, 175–184, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2-175-2016

Original research article 25 Apr 2016

Original research article | 25 Apr 2016

Effect of grassland cutting frequency on soil carbon storage – a case study on public lawns in three Swedish cities

C. Poeplau et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 4,839 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
3,634 1,028 177 4,839 167 199
  • HTML: 3,634
  • PDF: 1,028
  • XML: 177
  • Total: 4,839
  • BibTeX: 167
  • EndNote: 199
Views and downloads (calculated since 18 Jan 2016)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 18 Jan 2016)

Cited

Saved (final revised paper)

Saved (final revised paper)

Discussed (preprint)

Latest update: 06 Dec 2021
Download
Short summary
We compared two long-term contrasting systems of urban lawn management (frequently cut utility lawn vs. seldomly cut meadow-like lawn) regarding their effect on soil carbon in three Swedish cities. Biomass production was also measured during 1 year. The utility lawns had a significantly higher biomass production, which resulted in a higher soil carbon storage, since clippings were not removed. Soil carbon sequestration outweighed the higher management-related CO2 emissions of the utility lawns.