Articles | Volume 2, issue 2
SOIL, 2, 175–184, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2-175-2016
SOIL, 2, 175–184, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2-175-2016

Original research article 25 Apr 2016

Original research article | 25 Apr 2016

Effect of grassland cutting frequency on soil carbon storage – a case study on public lawns in three Swedish cities

C. Poeplau et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Revision (31 Mar 2016) by Carolina Boix-Fayos
AR by Christopher Poeplau on behalf of the Authors (04 Apr 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (12 Apr 2016) by Carolina Boix-Fayos
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (13 Apr 2016) by Kristof Van Oost(Executive Editor)
AR by Christopher Poeplau on behalf of the Authors (13 Apr 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
We compared two long-term contrasting systems of urban lawn management (frequently cut utility lawn vs. seldomly cut meadow-like lawn) regarding their effect on soil carbon in three Swedish cities. Biomass production was also measured during 1 year. The utility lawns had a significantly higher biomass production, which resulted in a higher soil carbon storage, since clippings were not removed. Soil carbon sequestration outweighed the higher management-related CO2 emissions of the utility lawns.