Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2021-109
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2021-109

  10 Nov 2021

10 Nov 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal SOIL.

Microbial soil characteristics of grassland and arable soils linked to thermogravimetry data: correlations, use and limits

Helena Doležalová-Weissmannová1, Stanislav Malý2, Martin Brtnický1,3, Jiří Holátko3, Michael Scott Demyan4, Christian Siewert5,6, David Tokarski6,7, Eliška Kameníková1, and Jiří Kučerík1 Helena Doležalová-Weissmannová et al.
  • 1Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Environmental Protection, Faculty of Chemistry, Brno University of Technology, Purkyňova 118, 61200 Brno, Czech Republic
  • 2Central Institute for Supervising and Testing in Agriculture, Hroznová 2, 65606 Brno, Czech Republic
  • 3Department of Agrochemistry, Soil Science, Microbiology and Plant Nutrition, Faculty of AgriSciences, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 61300 Brno, Czech Republic
  • 4School of Environment and Natural Resources, The Ohio State University, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
  • 5Technical University Berlin, Institute of Ecology, Chair of Soil Conservation, Ernst-Reuter-Platz 1, D-10587 Berlin, Germany
  • 6Technische Universität Dresden, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Institute of Soil Science and Site Ecology Pienner Straße 19, Tharandt 01737, Germany
  • 7LKS - Landwirtschaftliche Kommunikations-und Servicegesellschaft mbH, August-Bebel-Straße 6, 09577 Niederwiesa, Germany

Abstract. Thermogravimetry (TG) is a simple method that enables rapid analysis of soil properties such as the content of total organic C, nitrogen, clay and C fractions with different stability. However, the possible link between TG data and microbiological soil properties has not been systematically tested yet and limits TG application for soil and soil organic matter assessment. This work aimed to search and to validate relationships of thermal mass losses (TML) to total C and N contents, microbial biomass C and N, basal and substrate-induced respiration, extractable organic carbon content, anaerobic ammonification, urease activity, short-term nitrification activity, specific growth rate, and time to reach the maximum respiration rate for two sample sets of arable and grassland soils. Analyses of the training soil set revealed significant correlations of TML with basic soil properties such as carbon and nitrogen content with distinguishing linear regression parameters and temperatures of correlating mass losses for arable and grassland soils. In a second stage the equations of significant correlations were used for validation with an independent second sample set. This confirmed applicability of developed equations for prediction of microbiological properties mainly for arable soils. For grassland soils was the applicability lower, which was explained as the influence of rhizosphere processes. Nevertheless, the application of TG can facilitate the understanding of changes in soil caused by microorganism’s activity and the different regression equations between TG and soil parameters reflect changes in proportions between soil components caused by land use management.

Helena Doležalová-Weissmannová et al.

Status: open (until 29 Dec 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on soil-2021-109', Anonymous Referee #1, 29 Nov 2021 reply

Helena Doležalová-Weissmannová et al.

Helena Doležalová-Weissmannová et al.

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Short summary
Soil provides many ecosystem functions, which are orchestrated by the activity of soil microorganisms. For the assessment of the activity is necessary to employ many, sometimes, time-consuming, methods. We aim to replace all these methods by thermogravimetry, which registers mass losses induced by heating and previously appeared useful for analysis of soil carbon and nitrogen. Here, we show the potential of thermogravimetry to replace some methods and discuss its limits and problems.