Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2019-87
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2019-87
08 Jan 2020
 | 08 Jan 2020
Status: this preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Soil Aggregate Stability of Forest Islands and Adjacent Ecosystems in West Africa

Amelie Baomalgré Bougma, Korodjouma Ouattara, Halidou Compaore, Hassan Bismarck Nacro, Caleb Melenya, Samuel Ayodele Mesele, Vincent Logah, Azeez Jamiu Oladipupo, Elmar Veenendaal, and Jonathan Lloyd

Abstract. In the more mesic savanna areas of West Africa, significant areas of relatively tall and dense vegetation with a species composition more characteristic of forest than savanna are often found around villages areas. These forest islands may be the direct action of human activity. To better understand the processes leading to the development of these patches with relatively luxuriant vegetation, our study focused on the stability of the soil aggregates of forest islands, nearby areas of natural savanna vegetation across a precipitation transect in West Africa for which mean annual precipitation at the study sites ranges from 0.80 to 1.27 m a−1. Soil samples were taken from 0 to 5 cm and 5 to 10 cm depths and aggregate fractions with diameters: > 500 μm, 500–250 μm and 250–53 μm (viz. macro aggregates, mesoaggregates and microaggregates) determined using the water sieving method. The results showed significant higher proportion of stable meso and macro- aggregates in forest islands and natural savanna compared to agricultural soils (p < 0.05). On the other hand, although there was no effect of land-use type on microaggregates stabilities, there was a strong tendency for the micro-aggregate fraction across all land use types to increase with increasing precipitation. Simple regression analyses showed soil organic carbon and iron oxides contents as the most important factors influencing aggregate stability in West African ecosystems.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

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Amelie Baomalgré Bougma, Korodjouma Ouattara, Halidou Compaore, Hassan Bismarck Nacro, Caleb Melenya, Samuel Ayodele Mesele, Vincent Logah, Azeez Jamiu Oladipupo, Elmar Veenendaal, and Jonathan Lloyd

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Amelie Baomalgré Bougma, Korodjouma Ouattara, Halidou Compaore, Hassan Bismarck Nacro, Caleb Melenya, Samuel Ayodele Mesele, Vincent Logah, Azeez Jamiu Oladipupo, Elmar Veenendaal, and Jonathan Lloyd
Amelie Baomalgré Bougma, Korodjouma Ouattara, Halidou Compaore, Hassan Bismarck Nacro, Caleb Melenya, Samuel Ayodele Mesele, Vincent Logah, Azeez Jamiu Oladipupo, Elmar Veenendaal, and Jonathan Lloyd

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Short summary
To better understand the development of forest islands in west Africa, our study focused on soil aggregates stability of these patches across a precipitation transect. Soil samples were taken from 0 to 5 cm and 5 to 10 cm depths and aggregate fractions with diameters: > 500, 500–250 μm and 250–53 μm determined using the water sieving method. The results showed significant higher proportion of stable meso and macroaggregates in forest islands and natural savanna compared to agricultural soil.