Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2016-29
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-2016-29
24 May 2016
 | 24 May 2016
Status: this preprint was under review for the journal SOIL but the revision was not accepted.

Hydrological corridors for landscape and climate restoration: Prioritization of re-greening areas in Kenya and Tanzania

Judith E. M. Klostermann, Luuk Fleskens, Erik Querner, Herbert Ter Maat, Ronald Hutjes, Fons Jaspers, and Sander de Haas

Abstract. The Naga Foundation aims to implement durable re-greening interventions to increase local soil sustainability and regional water availability. When this is done on a large enough scale such landscape changes may also lead to positive regional climate impacts. Naga is developing a plan to re-green 15 large areas in Eastern Africa, creating a so-called hydrological corridor. Four potential hydrological corridors have been identified in Kenya and Tanzania, all four of them around Mount Kilimanjaro. To select the most promising corridor, a method was developed to support a decision in a situation where few data are available. The method is based on maps, models and literature from four different disciplines concerning soil, water, climate and social institutions. The findings favour the Tanzanian corridors and especially the Tanzania-East one, to start with re-greening projects. In that region many applicable land management options combine with a high potential for restoring soil organic matter, the highest rainfall recycling potential exists in the more favourable long rains season, while finally also the Tanzanian governments both at national and at local level seem more dependable for supporting hydrological corridor implementation.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Judith E. M. Klostermann, Luuk Fleskens, Erik Querner, Herbert Ter Maat, Ronald Hutjes, Fons Jaspers, and Sander de Haas
 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Judith E. M. Klostermann, Luuk Fleskens, Erik Querner, Herbert Ter Maat, Ronald Hutjes, Fons Jaspers, and Sander de Haas
Judith E. M. Klostermann, Luuk Fleskens, Erik Querner, Herbert Ter Maat, Ronald Hutjes, Fons Jaspers, and Sander de Haas

Viewed

Total article views: 1,799 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
1,000 704 95 1,799 90 105
  • HTML: 1,000
  • PDF: 704
  • XML: 95
  • Total: 1,799
  • BibTeX: 90
  • EndNote: 105
Views and downloads (calculated since 24 May 2016)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 24 May 2016)
Latest update: 23 Jun 2024
Download
Short summary
Regreening of degraded land can prevent erosion and increase water availability. If it is done at a sufficiently large scale it may also lead to positive climate feedbacks such as increased rainfall. We aimed to select the best locations for such a regreening effort. The selection method was based on soil characteristics, water systems, climate patterns and adaptive capacity of local societies. We concluded that the best place for a regreening corridor probably is in East Tanzania.