Articles | Volume 6, issue 1
SOIL, 6, 1–15, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-6-1-2020
SOIL, 6, 1–15, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-6-1-2020

Original research article 27 Jan 2020

Original research article | 27 Jan 2020

Lithology- and climate-controlled soil aggregate-size distribution and organic carbon stability in the Peruvian Andes

Songyu Yang et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (15 Oct 2019) by Raúl Zornoza
AR by Songyu Yang on behalf of the Authors (31 Oct 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (06 Nov 2019) by Raúl Zornoza
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (22 Nov 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (30 Nov 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (30 Nov 2019) by Raúl Zornoza
AR by Songyu Yang on behalf of the Authors (02 Dec 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (18 Dec 2019) by Raúl Zornoza
ED: Publish as is (18 Dec 2019) by Jorge Mataix-Solera(Executive Editor)
AR by Songyu Yang on behalf of the Authors (19 Dec 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
Download
Short summary
Soils store large carbon and are important for global warming. We do not know what factors are important for soil carbon storage in the alpine Andes or how they work. We studied how rainfall affects soil carbon storage related to soil structure. We found soil structure is not important, but soil carbon storage and stability controlled by rainfall is dependent on rocks under the soils. The results indicate that we should pay attention to the rocks when we study soil carbon storage in the Andes.